200,000 YR old Skull Cap Is Human Ancestor and “Nope, This Skull Was No Baboon”




Our Ancestor Homo Erectus Is 200,000 Years Older Than Previously Thought

This fragment of a Homo erectus cranium was almost overlooked by researchers. (Credit: Andy Herries, Jesse Martin and Renaud Joannes-Boyau)https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/our-ancestor-homo-erectus-is-200-000-years-older-than-previously-thought


This article appeared in Discover’s annual state of science issue as “Nope, This Skull Was No Baboon” Support our science journalism by becoming a subscriber.


For eight years, a crunched cranium protruded from an excavation pit in South Africa’s Drimolen Cave. Archaeologists ignored the fossil, assuming it to be a baboon, until they swept up pieces that had crumbled free in 2015. Early on, the remains looked more human than monkey.

Jesse Martin and Angeline Leece, researchers at Australia’s La Trobe University, jigsaw-puzzled together more than 150 bone bits, each no bigger than a quarter. Some were so fine that light shone through. Analysis confirmed the fossil wasn’t baboon. Then, in 2018, another skull surfaced at the Drimolen site, and chronometric dating placed both craniums around 2 million years old. The researchers published their big news in Science this April: Based on skull shape, the second cranium belonged to Paranthropus robustus, a Lucy-like relative with jumbo molars. The first came from Homo erectus — a species thought to have originated 200,000 years later in East Africa.

According to textbooks, “we’ve got the wrong fossil in the wrong place at the wrong time,” says Martin, a study co-author. He says the story needs to be updated.

A contemporaneous site 6 miles away yielded another cousin, Australopithecus sediba, in 2010 — meaning at least three lineages of the human family tree occupied South Africa about 2 million years ago.

Also in April, a Nature paper announced another set of relatives potentially crossed paths. Researchers from Griffith University in Australia redated a fossil discovered in 1921 in Zambia. Originally thought to be about 500,000 years old, the skull may belong to the species Homo heidelbergensis, ancestors with brains a half-cup smaller than today’s average. But the revised age shows this creature lived as recently as 300,000 years ago, suggesting H. heidelbergensis coexisted with our own species.

Both studies leave researchers wondering about close encounters between distinct human relatives: Did the evolutionary cousins clash or coexist?


 

An unusual skullcap and thousands of clues have created a southern twist to the story of human ancestors, in research published in Science on 3 April.


The rolling hills northwest of Johannesburg are famous for fossils of human-like creatures called hominins. Because of this, the area is known as the Cradle of Humankind.

"During our field school excavations at Drimolen, a student began uncovering a cluster of fragments. We could see that they were parts of a skull. But they weren't immediately identifiable," says Ms Stephanie Baker.

Baker is a researcher and Ph.D. candidate at the Palaeo-Research Institute at the University of Johannesburg. She manages research at the Drimolen fossil site in the Cradle of Humankind where the fragments of DNH 134 were found.

The international team was led by researchers from La Trobe University in Australia and Washington University in St. Louis in the United States.

Fossil forensics

Fossils that are millions of years old often come out of the soil in fragments. The fragments need to be rebuilt before researchers can confidently identify what kind of animal they came from.

"Over the course of the field season, more and more fragments were uncovered. We began piecing them together. No one could decide what this skullcap was from, until one night it all came together—and we realized we were looking at a hominin," she says. They named the skullcap DNH 134.


One of our direct human ancestors is older than we thought. The Cradle of Humankind northwest of Johannesburg, South Africa has yielded its first Homo erectus fossil, and the oldest found anywhere. Homo erectus experienced a changing climate, and moved out of Africa into other continents. The discovery of skullcap DNH 134 pushes the possible origin of Homo erectus back between 150,000 and 200,000 years. Credit: Therese van Wyk, University of Johannesburg

The next question was—what kind of hominin? The Cradle of Humankind has several different species of human ancestors and the Drimolen site had at least two kinds.

"This find really challenged us. We compared the assembled skullcap to all of the other examples of hominins in the Cradle area. Eventually, its teardrop shape and relatively big brain cavity meant we were looking at Homo erectus," says Baker.

Homo erectus is one of our direct human ancestors and is best known for migrating out of Africa into the rest of the world.

These hominins walked upright and were a more human-like species than the other hominins found in the Cradle. They had shorter arms and longer legs. They could walk and run for longer distances over the African grasslands than the others.



How old?

Once the question of 'which species?" was answered, two other huge questions presented themselves. How long ago was this individual alive? And how old were they when they died?


The researchers knew that no other Homo erectus fossils had ever been found in South Africa before. Even more surprising was the time period suggested by the soil layers the skull fragments were found in."Before we found DNH 134, we knew that the oldest Homo erectus in the world was from Dmanisi in Georgia dating to 1.8 million years ago," says Baker.


A Homo erectus skullcap found northwest of Johannesburg in South Africa has been identified as the oldest to date, in research published in Science. The hominin is a direct ancestor of modern humans, experienced a changing climate, and moved out of Africa into other continents. The discovery of DNH 134 pushes the possible origin of Homo erectus back between 150,000 and 200,000 years. Credit: Therese van Wyk, University of Johannesburg.

Building a 3-D puzzle over time

Trying to figure out how old fossils are from the caves west of Johannesburg is quite tricky. There were no volcanoes during the time of the hominins, so there are no ash layers to give the researchers quick age estimates, like they use for eastern African sites.

But while they were uncovering the fragments at Drimolen, they kept and recorded every clue they could find. This included fragments of small animals like bats and lizards, but also things like soil samples.

They can also tell exactly where in 3-D-space in the Drimolen quarry each little fossil fragment was found.

Then the research team used every possible dating technique available to get the most accurate possible date for the deposit. This included Palaeomagnetic dating, Electron spin resonance, Uranium lead dating, and faunal dating.

Possible shifted, earlier origin

"We collated all of the dates from each of these techniques and together they showed that we had a very precise age. We now know that the Drimolen Main Quarry and all of the fossils in it, are dated from 2.04 to 1.95 million years ago," says Baker.


DNH 134 cranium with styalised projection of the outline of the rest of the skull. Credit: Andy Herries, Jesse Martin and Renaud Joannes-Boyau

That means that DNH 134 is much older than the next oldest Homo erectus in Africa; and from Georgia.

"The age of the DNH 134 fossil shows that Homo erectus existed 150,000 to 200,000 years earlier than previously thought," says Professor Andy Herries. Herries is the project co-director with Ms Baker and lead researcher. He is Head of the Department of Archaeology and History, at La Trobe University in Australia and an associate in the Palaeo-Research Institute at UJ.

Because Homo erectus is one of our direct ancestors, the discovery has implications for the origins of modern humans.

"Until this find, we always assumed Homo erectus originated from eastern Africa. But DNH 134 shows that Homo erectus, one of our direct ancestors, possibly comes from southern Africa instead. That would mean that they later moved northwards into East Africa. From there they went through North Africa to populate the rest of the world," says Baker.

The skull is also unusual because it is the skull of a young Homo erectus.

"The Homo erectus skull we found, was likely aged between two and three years old when it died," says Herries.


The Drimolen excavations and excavated fossils. Credit: Andy Herries

Sharing a landscape

The age of the DNH 134 skullcap shows something else—that three species of early human ancestor lived in southern Africa at the same time at the Drimolen fossil site.

"We can now say Homo erectus shared the landscape with two other types of humans in South Africa, Paranthropus and Australopithecus," says Herries.

This might mean they needed to use different parts of the landscape to avoid competing with one another. For a start, they looked different.

Paranthropus robustus hominins were shorter than Homo erectus and Australopithecus, says Baker.

"Paranthropus robustus ate things like roots and tubers, which is why their teeth are really big. They used their enormous teeth for grinding down what we call fall-back foods—tough hard plants."

Changing weather

In comparison to the other two species, Homo erectus hominins were tall and slender. They ate things which are easier to digest, like fruits and berries.


The drimolen fossil site. Credit: Andy Herries

"We also know that they were eating meat, but we aren't exactly sure how they were getting it yet. We can say that at least these early Homo erectus weren't hunting with any weaponry yet," says Baker.

"We also know that they were able to cover long distances. Which turned out lucky for them, because during their time, the climate changed in southern Africa.

Paranthropus and Australopithecus evolved in warm and humid climates and were used to that. But then the weather began to shift from warm and humid, to cool and dry," she says.

Gradually the tree-cover diminished, and grasses took their place. Eventually the forests were replaced with the African savannah grasslands of today. The cooler weather suited the more mobile and social Homo erectus better. But it meant that Paranthropus had to rely on less desirable foods. Source: https://phys.org/news/2020-04-human-ancestor-homo-erectus-older.html


 

Welcome to Universal Lighthouse.

Shining Light On the Path to Universal Enlightenment

Posting Several Times a Day

Check out the Radio station, Broadcasting 24/7 High Vibe Music www.zeno.fm/universal-lighthouse-radio

Check out The Cosmic Healing Page For Scheduling a Session for REIKI Healing. https://universallighthous.wixsite.com/loveandlight/cosmic-healing

On Our Blog Page

You will enjoy: Research and study from Universal Lighthouse and incredible articles and videos from all over the virtual world. This is including But not limited to, Ancient Texts, paranormal and supernatural exploration, Metaphysical Theology, Spiritual Awareness, and 5D understanding. You will also enjoy: Adventuring into the Unknown, Full Disclosure, UFO/UAP Phenomenon, Forbidden Archeology, New & Ancient Technology, Quantum Exploration, New Discoveries, Our Creative Nature, The Brilliance of The Universe and Much More.

Universal Lighthouse offers our own Writings Plus, other information that is found throughout the Internet, We do try and find the original source for this information. However, the opinions, views, statements, and/or information we present are not necessarily the beliefs of Universal Lighthouse. Please use discernment with all the information given. We offer this knowledge free for Research and Study Purposes. Not all Posts may be a current event but is to be used as a Library of information. It is our goal to raise the consciousness of humanity through knowledge, truth, and love. We are Shining Light On the Path to Universal Enlightenment

Visit UNIVERSAL LIGHTHOUSE RADIO for 24/7 High Vibrational Music and Spiritual Enlightenment

www.zeno.fm/universal-lighthouse-radio

Please Like, subscribe and follow for more amazing discoveries and Universal Enlightenment.

JOIN US ON THE PLATFORM MEWE

Friend Us On MEWE https://mewe.com/i/universallighthouse

Check out our MeWe Groups

“THE INNER REALM” OPEN SHARING GROUP ((See All the Spiritual Posts from this Page)

https://mewe.com/group/6021c2ae0b624a46187952d9

"FULL DISCLOSURE" By Universal Lighthouse https://mewe.com/group/6009bb8bbb73327536581e83

Universal Lighthouse ~ Lightworkers and LightWarriors https://mewe.com/group/5b50e80a1327f70fd8859e82

FaceBook

Join us on our FB Page https://www.facebook.com/ULight1123/

Connect with us on our Blog

View Our Blog Here: https://universallighthous.wixsite.com/loveandlight/

Visit our Store Here: https://universallighthous.wixsite.com/uldesigns

Connect with us on Twitter: Universal Lighthouse: https://twitter.com/ULight1123

Follow us on Youtube: Universal Lighthouse

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXbFVy5RD9exUZpeqOHEqEw

Other Pages and Groups.

Goddess Heart~ https://www.facebook.com/GoddessHeartteachings

Twin Flame ~ Ancient Secrets~ https://www.facebook.com/Twin-Flames-Ancient-Secrets-321594358686155

FB Groups:

Cosmic Light Tribe~ https://www.facebook.com/groups/437103100063433/

Unconditional Unity~ https://www.facebook.com/groups/UnconditionalUnity

Universal Lighthouse Cosmic Healing

Universal Lighthouse Cosmic Healing is an Alternative and Complementary health care for the Body, Mind, and Spirit. Offering Remote/Distant Healing using Ancient Egyptian Clearing, Metaphysical Practices, Soul Awakening Techniques & Meditations, Usui Reiki, and Quantum Energy Work.

​DNA Repair

Heal Emotional Trauma Past and Present

Lower Stress and Anxiety

Overcome Addictions

Heal Obesity and Other Weight Issues

Reduce Pain and Promote Cell Regeneration

Help Reduce Inflammation, illness, and Disease

Chakra Clearing and Balancing

Entity Attachments

Pet Healing

And Much More...

Schedule a Cosmic Healing Session Today!!!

https://universallighthous.wixsite.com/loveandlight/cosmic-healing

36 views0 comments